The Plant Rx

Your resource for a plant-based diet

Posts Tagged ‘Vegetarianism’

Plant-based Health Study: Vanessa’s Rockin’ Results!

Posted by Jenn on April 13, 2011


The Plant-based health study concluded on March 15th.  Since then we have been testing our participants and gathering the final results and we are just about ready to present them all to you.  In the meantime, we will have some special posts on the individual participant’s results and their thoughts on participating in the study now that it is over.

 

Today I am very excited to present to you  Vanessa’s study results!

 

Vanessa's Plant-based Health Study Results

Vanessa entered our study as a 30 year old Dental student (who btw, is now a licensed Dentist! Congrats, Vanessa!) who consumed a Standard American Diet (SAD).  She was thin with a very good BMI.  Her pre-study lab work showed that she had hyperlipidemia with a total blood cholesterol of 255 (anything over 200 is considered “high”) and an LDL cholesterol of 130 (anything above 130 is considered “high”).  Her HDL values were phenomenal, among the best I’ve ever seen, and her triglycerides were also very good as was her A1C value.

After 30 days on a plant-based diet, Vanessa’s total cholesterol dropped from 255 to 206.  A 49 point drop! Her LDL cholesterol dropped from 130 to 86.  A 44 point drop!  These reductions almost brought her into acceptable blood cholesterol ranges.  Her LDL was now considered well within normal ranges and her Total Cholesterol was now only 6 points above what is considered to be the “normal” range.  All other values remained fairly constant including her weight and BMI.

After another 30 days (at the 60 day conclusion of our study), the results were even MORE impressive! Vanessa’s Total Cholesterol dropped another 28 points to 178! Further, her LDL cholesterol dropped an additional 28 points to 58! Talk about impressive!  In 60 days, Vanessa’s Total Cholesterol went from 255 to 178, a 77 point decrease! Her LDL Cholesterol went from 130 to 58, a 72 point decrease!  Thus, not only does Vanessa NO LONGER HAVE HYPERLIPIDEMIA, but she cut her LDL cholesterol (the bad cholesterol) more than in half!

As if that weren’t enough, her LDL values are now below what even Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn would consider safe and cardio-protective from the likes of heart disease and its co-morbidities!  Great job, Vanessa!

To read about Vanessa’s journey visit Vanessa’s Page under the Plant-based Health Study tab. Her final labs will also be posted on the main Plant-based Health Study page by weeks end in the interest of transparency.  Additionally, her final post and thoughts on her experience after getting her final results have been pasted below for you to read.

Please join me in thanking Vanessa for participating in our study as well as congratulating her on her amazing results!

Vanessa’s Final Post

(March 29, 2010)

The plant-based diet study has been over now for a few weeks.  I wish I could say that I have been keeping a strict plant-based diet since then, but that is not the case.  However, I am still keeping a diet which is predominantly plant-based.   I would say that over the course of two days, I might have one meal that includes some form of dairy.  Meat is a different story – I’ve never been a big meat-eater, so I don’t have as strong of a desire to include it back into my diet.

However, today may have been a game changer!

I just received the results from my final blood work and I am SHOCKED at the results.  I was pretty happy at the midpoint blood work when my LDL went down so significantly.  However, I had blood work done back in September that produced similar results.  I was happy that my cholesterol improved, but I honestly thought that things would probably plateau around these levels. Totally wrong! My LDL levels continued to plummet during the last 30 days.   My LDL levels went from 130 at the beginning of the study to 58! So now I feel like I need to rethink things…  I had originally decided that I didn’t want to completely eliminate all traces of dairy from my diet – a minimal amount would certainly make keeping this lifestyle a little easier without having a large impact on my physical health.  I think I still believe this, but I will definitely give pause before I opt to eat foods outside of a plant-based diet. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Plant-based Health Study, Success Stories, Tips, Women's Health | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Lessons Learned: From the participants in the plant-based health study

Posted by Jenn on March 12, 2011


The Plant-based Health Study ends this upcoming week on Tuesday, March 15th.  It has been a great experience for myself and the participants.  As we await the final (60 day) results from the study I asked the participants what were the top thing(s) they learned from participating in the study: switching from either a SAD or a vegetarian diet to a plant-based one.  Here’s what they had to say!

Jax

I cannot expect most doctors, manufactures, and producers of any edible products to be looking out for my best interests as far as what i put into my mouth. And you know what, I shouldn’t. It is my responsibility.  To  blame anyone other than myself would be like blaming  the man  who just hit me because it stepped into the middle of traffic because I thought they would stop for me as they were going 50mph. It is truly our own obligation to ourselves to read labels and educate ourselves. If our doctors are not properly trained and educated in nutrition as part of their training how can we possibly expect them to educate us?

And finally, eating plant-based all the time is not easy. It does take commitment. Commitment to our very lives. But even with that being said I am learning that moderation is KEY. However in America we don’t have any concept of what that really means and to me it means just this, treat animal based products like I would, say an Ice Cream Sundae.. yummy every once in a while but not an every meal occurrence or even an everyday occurrence.  See Jax’s Page.

John

This study has shown me that the SAD way of eating is a slow and sure way of cutting years off of all of our lives.  All of America has been brought up to think that the simplest way to get something to eat is to pull up to a drive thru window and grab a bag of pure poison to add to the hormone fed dinner that will be added to their bodies later in the evening.  I am not by far the healthiest person on the earth but this study has opened my eyes to a better way of eating through a mostly Plant Based Diet.  I do not know if I will stick strictly to a Plant based Diet but I do know that my hormone fed SAD eating is a thing of the past.  See John’s Page.

Amber

I have learned so much about ingredients and how everything has an effect. the smallest things can make the biggest differences. This has opened a huge window for me, not only am i staying vegan, i also would like to be gluten-free. after the major differences in how i feel and look i want to further my healthy life style. i am truly inspired. thank you Jenna!!!  See Amber’s Page.

Vanessa

Eating a plant-based diet doesn’t actually have to be that drastically different.   Sure, eating hemp seeds and tempeh and wheatgrass are great, but it’s probably best to keep things simple and stick with what you know in the beginning.  There were plenty of foods that I was already eating that fit in perfectly with a plant-based diet.  Also, don’t forget about beans, lentils, nuts, sweet potatoes, etc!  These guys filled me up and kept me full for longer.  Loads of veggies are great, but I felt a lot better when they were combined with some heartier foods. See Vanessa’s Page.

Nikki

One of the things I learned from the study was that there are so may other sources of protein that you can eat besides meat or fish or eggs. I have found that beans, legumes and tofu fill me up just as much. Also my husband who has mostly been vegan on this journey with me has seen a huge improvement in his brittle nails. His fingernails are now soft and supple and they don’t break as easily. He attributes this to the change in diet. Although I still struggle with my weight my cholesterol has come done significantly and I have learned I can control it with a plant-based diet.  See Nikki’s Page.

Megan

I can still make all of the dishes I love and make them vegan. Once they make a great vegan cheese, it will be perfect! But, it takes more time and can be expensive. One doesn’t find too many vegan options at the 99 cent store 🙂  I can still be satisfied and don’t feel ” cheated” by eating vegan. I had to get creative, and thank goodness for Mothers and Whole Foods! See Megan’s Page.

Stephanie

I learned that planning on a plant-based diet is absolutely essential.  I can pretty much “veganize” any recipe that I like.  That isn’t the hard part.  The more difficult part is when you are out to eat or tired and don’t feel like cooking, etc. It you plan ahead you can be prepared for those times and this makes eating this way a lot easier.  It takes time to get used to but you do get used to it and it isn’t as hard as you might think.  I do like the food.  I don’t miss meat at all, but I do still have cheese cravings.  Yes, Jenna, I know it’s the casomorphins! 🙂 I am planning on remaining plant-based for life as my health has improved substantially as a result. Now if that cheese craving would just go away… 🙂 See Stephanie’s Page.

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Interview with Dr. Jenna Taylor from The PLANT RX – Blog – Health and Happiness Club

Posted by Jenn on March 10, 2011


Interview with Dr. Jenna Taylor from The PLANT RX – Blog – Health and Happiness Club.

Jenna & friend

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Top 5 things our plant-based health study taught this M.D.

Posted by Jenn on March 7, 2011


One truly amazing thing about life is that we have the opportunity to continuously learn new things. Learning new things rocks!  And, while we were pretty sure what the outcomes would be, this was no exception.

We are still 9 days away from the official end of the plant-based health study and approximately 12-14 days from having the final results available to us and published.  That being said, while contemplating the parameters for our next study and reviewing reader submitted ideas on things they would like to see us measure in the future, I got to thinking about all the amazing things that I’ve learned so far in this one.

Here are the top 5!


1. Psoriasis

There are a lot of  anecdotal stories out there on how a plant-based diet can be beneficial in the treatment of medical conditions and disease other than heart disease, diabetes, high cholesterol and certain cancers.  There is also some scientific research to back up those ascertations but much more needs to be done before it can be said with a great degree of certainty that this is indeed the case.

That being said, I have never seen it first hand.  Until now! Amber, one of the study participants, has struggled with psoriasis for quite some time – experiencing a number of patches on both her arms and legs.  She has tried a number of different things to keep this chronic autoimmune condition at bay, but while some treatments have helped, none have been close to a cure.

After 30 days on a diet completely free of meat and dairy products, Amber has experienced almost 100% resolution of her patches! I’ve seen it first hand and I couldn’t be more happy for her.  It’s one thing to read or hear about these types of things but it’s quite another to see it first-hand.

2. Probiotics

It’s important not to make blanket statements about medicines/treatments especially when there isn’t any substantial clinical evidence or experience to back it up.  When it comes to probiotics there is data out there but none directly pertaining to any benefits they may or may not have when someone is transitioning to  plant-based diet.

As in the situation above, I have heard anecdotal accounts of probiotics being helpful but not much otherwise.  During the course of our study several of the participants had some gastrointestinal (GI) discomfort as a result of moving to a plant-based diet.

Note:  This is common and it is apart of the natural detoxification process.

The participants who experienced the GI upset took probiotics to help with these symptoms.  Everyone who used them said they helped.  The degree to which they helped varied from substantial to adequate.  Thus, I would say I now know that probiotics can be a useful consideration in those experiencing GI issues as the result of a switch from a Standard American Diet (SAD) to a plant-based one.

3. Oil, oil, oil…

While everyone in the plant-based community agrees on the exclusion of meat and dairy products from our diet for prevention and reversal of disease, not everyone agrees on whether or not oils and highly saturated fat laden foods (i.e. nuts & avocados) should be omitted as well.

In fact, two of the foremost thought leaders seem to diverge on this as well: Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn and Dr. Dean Ornish. Esselstyn’s mantra  is “moderation kills” and he advocates a plant-based diet that excludes oils, nuts, etc even if they are technically “plant-based”.

Ornish, on the other hand, is much less strict on this issue and allows for their inclusion, although he still emphasizes a diet as low in saturated fat as possible (less than 10% of daily caloric intake).  That doesn’t exactly allow for much oil anyway being that olive oil for example has approximately 120 calories per tablespoon with 2 grams (or 14%) coming from saturated fat, 78% from monounsaturated fat and 8% for polyunsaturated fat. No matter how you looks at it, olive oil is 120 calories of pure fat per tablespoon.

Without delving into the argument of good fats vs. bad fats, etc. and the reason behind why Esselstyn has adopted this stringent mantra and Ornish has not, I wasn’t 100% sure of where I stood on the whole debate other than the obvious observation that less fat is better.

I now can say that this study (in addition to a few other poignant reasons I’ll discuss in an upcoming post) has resulted in me landing on Esselstyn’s side of the fence. The reason is due to the increased triglyceride levels in some of the participants despite the reductions in their total and LDL cholesterol.  I think it is likely that these triglyceride increases seen in some of the participants are the result of increased consumption of oils, nuts and other highly saturated fat laden foods.

Additionally, when first adjusting to the switch to a plant-based diet many opt for pre-packaged processed vegan foods such as vegan cheese, veganaise, and prepared vegan meals which are extremely high in saturated fat.  Further, when eating out at mainstream restaurants the vegetarian and vegan options (which tend to be few) are often cooked in lots of oil to enhance taste. This is done to ensure that these menu items are just as tasty as there SAD counterparts.

It is my expectation that once acclimated more fully to plant-based nutrition people will end up cooking more at home and becoming more astute regarding their choices and their triglyceride levels will eventually decrease as well.

How about this for a visual: Animal fat is a solid at room temperature whereas plant is liquid.  Imagine how well that solid stuff fares in your GI tract.

4. Sugar, sugar, sugar.  Pre-diabetes, and Hemoglobin A1Cs

I love sweet things!  Who doesn’t?  We all know we should do our best to limit our consumption of these items and some of us do better than others.  If you are vegan, most likely you already limit if not exclude the consumption of sugar because the majority of it is processed with animal bone char (charcoal made from animal bones). – –actually the explanation is much more convoluted than this, but this works for our purpose here.

The participants in our study were not restricted with regard to sugar consumption.  The aim of this study was to look at the benefits of a plant-based diet on a macro level and not get lost in the details.  Please note I am not discounting the importance of these details, we simply chose not to focus on these for the sake of study compliance.

The reason this is important is because of the increasing prevalence of  “pre-diabetes” here in the U.S. and the obvious role that large amounts of sugar found in the SAD contribute to this trend. Prior to our study beginning, 4 of the 7 participants had Hemoglobin A1C values that would classify them as pre-diabetic (>5.7).  After only 30 days all 4 of the participants lowered this value by .4!

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Cholesterol, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Plant-based Health Study | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments »

Success story of the week: Lindsay!

Posted by Jenn on March 4, 2011


(This week’s success story is a little early, but better than late!)

Meet Lindsay:

Lindsay

 

 

Lindsay Wolf is a Los Angeles-based animal advocate, actress, and founder of Kiss Me, I’m Vegan!, “a blog for the happy vegan in all of us.” KMIV blends Lindsay’s personal vegan journey with the journeys of other vegan superheroes who endlessly inspire her, including interviews with authors Colleen Patrick-Goudreau of Compassionate Cooks, THE Skinny Bitch herself, Rory Freedman and Veganomicon‘s Isa Chandra Moskowitz, as well as Gene Baur of Farm Sanctuary, Jenny Brown of Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary and Animal Rights Hall of Fame recipient Zoe Weil. Lindsay has also guest blogged on The Kind Life, Your Daily Vegan, Vegan At Heart, and LeaveItBetter.com, and she’s a regular visitor and fan of Animal Acres Sanctuary in Acton, CA. Check more out at www.kissmeimvegan.com.

The Plant Rx’s Interview with Lindsay!

 


  • What your diet was like before adopting a plant-based diet?

Before I transitioned to a vegan lifestyle, my diet consisted of occasional trips to McDonald’s for midnight double whopper runs. That alone should tell you that I was not at all connected to the food I ate or my health! I definitely didn’t eat whole foods, but rather consumed a lot of processed, “low fat” junk food and animal products – cheese, steak, and ice cream being huge go-to choices, for example. I was completely disconnected from consuming wholesome, healthy food, but rather ate to get to a certain weight or ate from being stressed – not a good way to live, if you ask me. It wasn’t until I went vegan that I ever began to listen to my body to discover what foods I really need on a daily basis – and those foods are a far cry from the double whoppers of the past!

  • Why did you choose to adopt a plant-based diet? (health, animal ethics, environment, etc)

I am doing this 100% for the animals. After witnessing documented animal cruelty back in 2007, I could not in good conscience support a system where, in order to make me a delicious meal, an animal had to suffer, be confined, and die a painful death (you can learn more about my journey into veganism here: http://kissmyvegan.blogspot.com/p/about-me.html). What cemented my decision was the experience of learning that we don’t need animal products to live healthily, which made eating an ice cream sundae just because I liked ice cream not so enjoyable anymore. That’s not to say I don’t eat ice cream – I do now, and plenty of it! I just eat coconut milk-based or soy-based alternatives to my favorite ice cream dishes of the past. They are just as delicious, and no mommy or baby cows had to suffer for my dessert!

  • Was it hard/easy/as you expected?

The first few months were only difficult because I didn’t know how to cook or bake for myself. I had to basically re-teach myself how to make food! Besides that, it was super easy. Since I was choosing to take into account the well being of animals at every meal, I didn’t think twice about turning down a slice of cake when out with friends or butter-topped popcorn at the movies. It was the least I could do to help the world a little each and every day. Over time, I learned how to make my own delicious versions of the foods I used to love, and it got easier and easier with each bite. Now, the thought of ever going back to eating animal products just seems silly to me – I will be a vegan for my entire life, happily and healthily!

  • What changes have you seen as a result of switching; has it changed your life? If so how?

Well, for starters, I have more energy, I’m in better general health, and I actually care about the food I put into my body! Read the rest of this entry »

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Success story of the week: JL

Posted by Jenn on February 28, 2011


A Success story interview with JL!
  • What your diet was like before adopting a plant-based/ vegan diet?

I was on an eight year vegetarian journey before going vegan. I ate most vegetarian (still at fish) for four years and then for four years I ate completely vegetarian.  I ate mostly whole grains, “good fats,” veggies and lots (lots!) of cheese, milk, eggs, milk and tofu.  During these eight years I took up running and triathlon.

  • Why did you chose  to transition/switch (health, animal ethics, environmental reasons)?

I went vegan for dietary reasons.  I wasn’t feeling good (digestion) and had some recurring skin issues.  I went to a nutrition counselor to try a seasonal cleanse. By the end of the cleanse, which omitted whole wheat, dairy, caffeine, alcohol, and sugar, I realized I was an egg away from being vegan. I decided to try a vegan diet.  Several months after going vegan I noticed a shift in my thinking. I say that I became vegan for dietary reasons. I remain vegan for ethical reasons.

  • Was it hard/easy/as you expected, etc to transition?

It was surprisingly easy to begin and maintain a vegan diet!  But it’s because I surround myself with support.  I read vegan blogs religiously. I bought cookbooks.  I follow hundreds of vegans on Twitter.  I’ve never had an unanswered question and I think that it was has been key.

  • What changes have you seen as a result of switching to a plant-based diet? has it changed anything in your life? If so how? Motivated you to do things you hadn’t done in the past? Try new things?
Physically, I feel better than ever.  In addition to eating vegan, I have increased raw foods into my diet. I’m sleeping well, my energy is high and finally some of those nagging skins issues (eczema and candida-ish skin reactions) are subsiding.
But most importantly, I have fallen in love with food. I love preparing healthy, delicious vegan food.  My relationship to food has changed drastically. So much so that this January, when I would normally start my “annual” diet, I decided to simply embrace those 10 pounds that always found me by January 1. I realized that perhaps those 10 pounds were part of me and shouldn’t be banished.  I bought bigger clothes and quit weighing myself on a daily basis.  At 45, I feel free!
  • How do you feel now?

Never better. Seriously.

To read more about JL’s journey, check out her blog:  JL goes Vegan: Food & Fitness with a side of Kale

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30-day results here soon! The plant-based health study has reached it’s mid-point

Posted by Jenn on February 15, 2011


The participants are getting their labs and measurements taken throughout this week.  Results will be posted as we get them.  We will have the results for two of our participants, Stephanie and John, as early as tomorrow! As promised, we will be posting full copies of their medical results so that you can compare them to their pre-study values.

A word of caution when evaluating this data –  while it is well documented that after only 30 days on a plant-based diet we can see improvements in the various components of our lipid profiles (among other parameters) it is important to point out that everyone is different and it can take longer in some cases than in others.  I say this because there are other factors at play here that we did not take into account for this particular study.

For example, although I didn’t recommend eating processed foods or limiting oil use for this study, these were not off-limits to the participants.  The only requirement was they could not eat any meat or dairy products.  Consequently, it is clear how skewed consumption of these items could heavily impact the results.

Note: Some of you may be wondering why the parameters were not made more strict regarding food intake. There are a few reasons for this.  The first is that, as many of you well know, it is not easy to transition from a SAD to a plant-based one.  Even those transitioning from a vegetarian diet still the transition difficult at times.  Thus, the hope was to increase greater compliance and minimal discontinuation considering the small scale of the study.  The second was that  all things considered this is likely how the transition occurs in most cases, if not more gradual.  Lastly, I wanted to see what the impact of  diet completely free of animal protein would be independent of other factors such as processed foods, junk foods and high/moderate oil consumption.  Answering the question, even if poor eating habits are continued, if there still a substantial health benefit as long as those habits are free of animal protein.

Click here to meet our participants!

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The Protein Conundrum: the REAL truth about Protein

Posted by Jenn on February 7, 2011


Out of all the conflicting information that is bestowed upon the American public in regards to nutrition, the one seemingly straight forward and universally agreed upon tenet is the importance of protein.  The general consensus is that in order to maintain a healthy weight and be healthy in general, it is vital to consume enough lean protein (which in America typically equates to white meat and fish) and limit intake of carbohydrates. It is commonplace to hear people say,”I really need to eat more protein”.  Whereas it would be almost shocking to hear someone say,”I really need to eat more carbs”. One might go so far as to say American’s are obsessed with protein.

It is for this reason that protein is frequently at the top of the list of concerned family members and skeptical friends and why those who eat a plant-based diet are bombarded by questions about where they get their protein.  In fact, people not familiar with plant-based nutrition often assume that it is terribly hard to get enough protein by consuming a diet free of meat and dairy products. In the same vein, most carnivores are not aware of how much protein they are consuming on a daily basis and that they are likely consuming far too much which can be detrimental over time.

So, what is the real truth? Below, I will address and answer the common questions I am asked regarding protein consumption and a plant-based diet.


  • Where do people who consume a plant-based diet get their protein? Do plant-based protein sources provide enough protein to be healthy?

Almost every food contains protein, so it’s nearly impossible not to get enough if you’re consuming an adequate amount of calories.  Protein is found in ALL plant foods including vegetables (yes, vegetables!), grains, legumes (such as beans and lentils), soy foods, seeds and nuts. As long as your diet contains a variety of grains, legumes and vegetables protein needs are easily met.

Protein Comparison Chart

  • Is there a difference between Plant-based protein sources and Animal-based ones? I heard animal sources provide better (quality) protein, is this true?

Protein is an essential nutrient which when ingested is broken down into it’s building blocks which are called amino acids. There are 20 amino acids used by our bodies to build the various proteins our body needs.  Of these 20 our body is capable of making 11 of them on its on.  Nine of them cannot be made by the body and therefore must be obtained through our diet. Because our bodies cannot make these 9 amino acids they are termed “essential” amino acids meaning it is essential to get these through our diets.

In the past, food sources that contained all of the essential amino acids were called “high quality” or “complete” proteins.  Animal proteins contain this complete complement of essential amino acids and therefore are termed “high quality”. This is where the notion of protein from animal sources having better quality protein over that of plant sources originated. This is not true, however.  The truth is all plant proteins have some of every essential amino acid.  The difference is that some plant protein sources have this full complement of amino acids in abundance (soybeans, quinoa, spinach) like animal sources do whereas as some have all of these essential amino acids but the amounts of one or two of these amino acids may be low. For example, grains are lower in lysine and legumes are lower in methionine than those protein sources designated as “high quality”.  This is where the idea of combining or complementing of proteins came from for vegetarians and vegans.

  • Do I need to combine proteins or monitor my consumption?

In an effort to make sure that all vegetarians and vegans were getting enough of all the amino acids, in the early 1970’s in her book Diet for a Small PlanetFrances Moore Lappe popularized this idea of combining plant proteins at each meal in order to get a “complete” protein.  For example, mixing beans and grains to get enough Lysine and Methionine at each meal. This practice has since been refuted as unnecessary since it is now well-known that our livers store the various amino acids and it’s not critical to combine different protein sources at each meal. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Foods, Protein, Women's Health | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

YumUniverse.com ‘s Interview of yours truly…

Posted by Jenn on January 25, 2011


http://www.yumuniverse.com/2011/01/21/the-plant-rx-plant-based-health-study-interview-with-dr-jenna-taylor/

Visit Heather Crosby’s YumUniverse to read the full interview (Link Above).


The Plant Rx Plant-Based Health Study: Interview with Dr. Jenna Taylor – By: Heather Crosby of YumUniverse.


If you do one thing for yourself and your health today, please take 10 minutes to read the following interview with Dr. Jenna Taylor, founder of The Plant Rx.

Jenna is an inspiring woman who is currently conducting a very important 60-day plant-based diet study, in which participants (StephanieNikkiVanessaMegan,John and Jax and Amber) will be changing their diets from either a Standard American Diet (S.A.D.) or a Vegetarian Diet, to a Plant-based (Vegan) diet for 60 days. Dr. Taylor and her team will be measuring the participants changes in health, both quantitatively and qualitatively—and in an effort to be as transparent as possible, all test results will be published at ThePlantRx.com.

Dr. Taylor’s perspectives not only as a physician, but as a vegan, are invaluable, and I am looking forward to sharing more of her progress and efforts to share the benefits of a plant-based diet with YU.

One of the most important things she said during our interview is that “[physicians] have been subjected to the same programming as you and I were and just like lots of other people out there, they still believe it. That being said, this is why it is imperative for people to be in charge of their own health. Ask questions, read, research, etc. No one is going to care more about you, than you do.”

Amen, sister.

– – –
YU: So, you have had some pretty significant personal results from adopting a plant-based diet. Tell us a little more about that.

Dr. T: I have and I didn’t expect any of them. Everything about transitioning toThe Plant Rx has been a positive, pleasant surprise. I was in very good health from a medical perspective, but I had no idea the harm that I was potentially causing my body.

You see, we practice what I call “reactionary” medicine in the United States. We don’t go to the doctor unless something is wrong. The problem with this approach is that many of us feel just fine until our mid-thirties, early forties or even longer. We don’t see what is happening on the inside of our bodies and our health system isn’t set up help us look at those things before that. In my case, the only “real” health issue I struggled with that I was aware of was Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). I didn’t think that it had anything to do with my diet as I had kept food logs and couldn’t identify any “trigger” foods so to speak. I would have episodes about once a month and the pain would be so terribly excruciating that I would literally pass out because my body could not tolerate it. Since adopting The Plant Rx diet I have not had one episode. Further, my cholesterol numbers got significantly better, I felt better—more energy, better sleep and I lost some weight too.

YU: What health goals do you have set for the future? Any issues you are dealing with now that you feel confident will go away eventually?
Dr. T: I feel great right now. I am rarely sick and the only issue I need to find a solution to is my poor posture while typing on my laptop! I plan on taking care of myself the way that I think we should practice medicine, preventatively. We need more of a focus on overall wellness in addition to The Plant Rx. This includes things like regular exercise, meditation and strong interpersonal relationships.

YU: How do you personally stay on track? Share some favorite tips (ie: travel, busy schedules, budget, dining out).
Dr. T: Planning ahead. The one thing that I wish I would have known when I transitioned was to always plan ahead because you will inevitably find yourself in a situation with little to no options for eating. For me, this means always keeping snacks with me. I make sure I have stuff at work and even a few things in the car. L.A. traffic is not kind to a hungry vegan at times!

At home, I cook on the weekends. I’m single, so cooking every night doesn’t make sense and I’m usually too tired by the time I get home from work and just want something, anything, as long as it’s immediate. Thus, I cook on the weekends and make enough to have left overs for my lunch that week and I freeze some of it so I can easily have something for times when I’m away for the weekend and don’t have the time to cook. Also, while I would prefer to have fresh organic fruits and veggies in the house, that isn’t really feasible all the time so I do buy a lot of frozen fruits and vegetables. Dining out can be a challenge, but I live by the “be creative” rule. I look at it this way, the worst case scenario is that the restaurant folks think I am difficult and weird when ordering, maybe my friends even will too, but that’s ok because I’m not going to get heart disease. I can live with that trade-off!

YU: What are your favorite plant-based meals?
Dr. T: For my Plant Rx I make super yummy pasta fagliole, chili and lentil loaf. My all-time favorite Plant Rx is a wheatberry curry casserole. The recipe as written should have chicken in it but I leave out the chicken and add more veggies.

YU: Are you eating any new foods now that you didn’t before (ie: quinoa, superfoods)?
Dr. T: Yes! I had never eaten quinoa or pomegranates, which are two of my favorites now. I also found out about this stuff called liquid aminos from Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn’s book. I love it and use it in a bunch of different things.

Click here to read the rest of the article at: YumUniverse.com

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Plant-Based Health Study has officially Kicked-off!

Posted by Jenn on January 15, 2011


Last night the participants and I had our official kick-off meeting at the Terranea Resort in Palos Verdes, CA.  We had a great time and participants are enjoying their very first day on their newly adopted plant-based diet. Make sure you click on the “Plant-based Health Study” page/tab to meet our participants and see their initial (baseline) lab results! Then, visit their individual pages to follow them throughout their journeys and give them support.

Pictures from the event:

Stephanie, Jenna, Christian, Megan and Matt

Discussing the Study over some drinks

Megan & Matt

Christian & Jenn

Vanessa, Megan , Matt and John

Stephanie and Megan

John & Jax

Stephanie & Jenn

Nikki, Vanessa, Megan, Matt and John

Jenn & Christian

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