The Plant Rx

Your resource for a plant-based diet

Posts Tagged ‘healthy living’

Need a resource for unbiased Nutrition Information?

Posted by Jenn on January 16, 2013


Harvard School of Public Health

Where do you get your nutrition information?

What resources do you trust? How do you know they are the best?

“You may have heard that ‘knowledge is power,’ or that information, the raw material of knowledge, is power. But the truth is that only some information is power: reliable and accurate information”.  Information to the contrary, is not merely careless, it can be dangerous and destructive especially when it comes to your health.

Today we have the luxury of having vast amounts of information right at our fingertips.  Just type in a few words and away you go.  You can find information on just about anything you can think of and nutrition information is no exception.  The question becomes how do you decipher which information is credible and best and which is not.

After all, with different factions pontificating one diet over another, special interests doing what they do best and with new clinical studies contradicting the very information we once thought was gospel on a seemingly regular basis  – how do you know what or who to trust?

The 3 attributes I consider most valuable when evaluating these information sources are:

  • Bias – What is this particular groups, organization, entity, web site or person’s motivation? Is it to inform, persuade, sell, and/or change an attitude or belief? What do they have to gain or lose?
  • Reputation and Credibility – What is this particular group, organization, entity, web site or person’s mission, values and goals? Is there a governing body that ensures these are met?  How long has this particular group, organization, entity, site  been in existence?
  • Transparency -Does this particular group, organization, entity,web site or person’s have evidence to back up their claims and is it readily accessible? And if so, what are the sources of this information? What are their credentials (see bullet #2) And do they have a bias (see bullet #1)?

The Harvard School of Public Health’s: Nutrition Source

meets the afore-mentioned criteria in innumerable ways.  Furthermore, it is expertly maintained, easy to navigate and always up to date on the most recent research and public health information. But, don’t take my word for it, check it out for yourself and let me know what you think! I would love to hear your feedback.

SOURCES:

Harris, Robert. “Evaluating Internet Research Sources,” [ http://www.sccu.edu/faculty/R_Harris/evalu8it.htm ] (March, 1999) @ http://education.illinois.edu/wp/credibility/index.html.

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YumUniverse.com ‘s Interview of yours truly…

Posted by Jenn on January 25, 2011


http://www.yumuniverse.com/2011/01/21/the-plant-rx-plant-based-health-study-interview-with-dr-jenna-taylor/

Visit Heather Crosby’s YumUniverse to read the full interview (Link Above).


The Plant Rx Plant-Based Health Study: Interview with Dr. Jenna Taylor – By: Heather Crosby of YumUniverse.


If you do one thing for yourself and your health today, please take 10 minutes to read the following interview with Dr. Jenna Taylor, founder of The Plant Rx.

Jenna is an inspiring woman who is currently conducting a very important 60-day plant-based diet study, in which participants (StephanieNikkiVanessaMegan,John and Jax and Amber) will be changing their diets from either a Standard American Diet (S.A.D.) or a Vegetarian Diet, to a Plant-based (Vegan) diet for 60 days. Dr. Taylor and her team will be measuring the participants changes in health, both quantitatively and qualitatively—and in an effort to be as transparent as possible, all test results will be published at ThePlantRx.com.

Dr. Taylor’s perspectives not only as a physician, but as a vegan, are invaluable, and I am looking forward to sharing more of her progress and efforts to share the benefits of a plant-based diet with YU.

One of the most important things she said during our interview is that “[physicians] have been subjected to the same programming as you and I were and just like lots of other people out there, they still believe it. That being said, this is why it is imperative for people to be in charge of their own health. Ask questions, read, research, etc. No one is going to care more about you, than you do.”

Amen, sister.

– – –
YU: So, you have had some pretty significant personal results from adopting a plant-based diet. Tell us a little more about that.

Dr. T: I have and I didn’t expect any of them. Everything about transitioning toThe Plant Rx has been a positive, pleasant surprise. I was in very good health from a medical perspective, but I had no idea the harm that I was potentially causing my body.

You see, we practice what I call “reactionary” medicine in the United States. We don’t go to the doctor unless something is wrong. The problem with this approach is that many of us feel just fine until our mid-thirties, early forties or even longer. We don’t see what is happening on the inside of our bodies and our health system isn’t set up help us look at those things before that. In my case, the only “real” health issue I struggled with that I was aware of was Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). I didn’t think that it had anything to do with my diet as I had kept food logs and couldn’t identify any “trigger” foods so to speak. I would have episodes about once a month and the pain would be so terribly excruciating that I would literally pass out because my body could not tolerate it. Since adopting The Plant Rx diet I have not had one episode. Further, my cholesterol numbers got significantly better, I felt better—more energy, better sleep and I lost some weight too.

YU: What health goals do you have set for the future? Any issues you are dealing with now that you feel confident will go away eventually?
Dr. T: I feel great right now. I am rarely sick and the only issue I need to find a solution to is my poor posture while typing on my laptop! I plan on taking care of myself the way that I think we should practice medicine, preventatively. We need more of a focus on overall wellness in addition to The Plant Rx. This includes things like regular exercise, meditation and strong interpersonal relationships.

YU: How do you personally stay on track? Share some favorite tips (ie: travel, busy schedules, budget, dining out).
Dr. T: Planning ahead. The one thing that I wish I would have known when I transitioned was to always plan ahead because you will inevitably find yourself in a situation with little to no options for eating. For me, this means always keeping snacks with me. I make sure I have stuff at work and even a few things in the car. L.A. traffic is not kind to a hungry vegan at times!

At home, I cook on the weekends. I’m single, so cooking every night doesn’t make sense and I’m usually too tired by the time I get home from work and just want something, anything, as long as it’s immediate. Thus, I cook on the weekends and make enough to have left overs for my lunch that week and I freeze some of it so I can easily have something for times when I’m away for the weekend and don’t have the time to cook. Also, while I would prefer to have fresh organic fruits and veggies in the house, that isn’t really feasible all the time so I do buy a lot of frozen fruits and vegetables. Dining out can be a challenge, but I live by the “be creative” rule. I look at it this way, the worst case scenario is that the restaurant folks think I am difficult and weird when ordering, maybe my friends even will too, but that’s ok because I’m not going to get heart disease. I can live with that trade-off!

YU: What are your favorite plant-based meals?
Dr. T: For my Plant Rx I make super yummy pasta fagliole, chili and lentil loaf. My all-time favorite Plant Rx is a wheatberry curry casserole. The recipe as written should have chicken in it but I leave out the chicken and add more veggies.

YU: Are you eating any new foods now that you didn’t before (ie: quinoa, superfoods)?
Dr. T: Yes! I had never eaten quinoa or pomegranates, which are two of my favorites now. I also found out about this stuff called liquid aminos from Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn’s book. I love it and use it in a bunch of different things.

Click here to read the rest of the article at: YumUniverse.com

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