The Plant Rx

Your resource for a plant-based diet

Need a resource for unbiased Nutrition Information?

Posted by Jenn on January 16, 2013


Harvard School of Public Health

Where do you get your nutrition information?

What resources do you trust? How do you know they are the best?

“You may have heard that ‘knowledge is power,’ or that information, the raw material of knowledge, is power. But the truth is that only some information is power: reliable and accurate information”.  Information to the contrary, is not merely careless, it can be dangerous and destructive especially when it comes to your health.

Today we have the luxury of having vast amounts of information right at our fingertips.  Just type in a few words and away you go.  You can find information on just about anything you can think of and nutrition information is no exception.  The question becomes how do you decipher which information is credible and best and which is not.

After all, with different factions pontificating one diet over another, special interests doing what they do best and with new clinical studies contradicting the very information we once thought was gospel on a seemingly regular basis  – how do you know what or who to trust?

The 3 attributes I consider most valuable when evaluating these information sources are:

  • Bias – What is this particular groups, organization, entity, web site or person’s motivation? Is it to inform, persuade, sell, and/or change an attitude or belief? What do they have to gain or lose?
  • Reputation and Credibility – What is this particular group, organization, entity, web site or person’s mission, values and goals? Is there a governing body that ensures these are met?  How long has this particular group, organization, entity, site  been in existence?
  • Transparency -Does this particular group, organization, entity,web site or person’s have evidence to back up their claims and is it readily accessible? And if so, what are the sources of this information? What are their credentials (see bullet #2) And do they have a bias (see bullet #1)?

The Harvard School of Public Health’s: Nutrition Source

meets the afore-mentioned criteria in innumerable ways.  Furthermore, it is expertly maintained, easy to navigate and always up to date on the most recent research and public health information. But, don’t take my word for it, check it out for yourself and let me know what you think! I would love to hear your feedback.

SOURCES:

Harris, Robert. “Evaluating Internet Research Sources,” [ http://www.sccu.edu/faculty/R_Harris/evalu8it.htm ] (March, 1999) @ http://education.illinois.edu/wp/credibility/index.html.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: